Encaustic Slide

Drumroll, Please!

October 17, 2011 - Written by  Laura Moriarty

It is with great excitement that we share with you the list of artists selected to be included in the inaugural edition of Encaustic Works ‘12.

Joanne Mattera combed through 416 submissions, and whittled it down to a group of 50 artists whose work will be featured in the book, (you didn’t fall for that silly talk about 18, did you?).

Joanne has also written a fabulous and extensive essay about contemporary encaustic that will be illustrated with artwork culled from submissions. Our original thinking was that this essay could be an opportunity to provide a sort of honorable mention and allow us to include a few more artists, but now that we’ve read the essay and seen the artwork, we see it differently. The essay is more like the meat and potatoes of the book; the portfolio section, which will feature 29 artists, is the dessert! We therefore consider all artists featured in the book, whether with one image or a portfolio spread, equal winners.

 

Following is a list of the Selected Artists:

Kevin Frank | Fanne Fernow | Ann-Marie Brown | Debra Ramsay | Howard Hersh | Lisa Pressman | Binnie Birstein | Willow Bader | Cherie Mittenthal | Cecile Chong | Marybeth Rothman | Kim Bernard | Eileen Goldenberg | Jane Nodine | Ellen Koment | Lynda Ray | Nancy Natale | Alexandre Masino | Paula Roland | David A. Clark | Kathleen Lemoine | Andrea Benson | Lisa Kairos | Pam Farrell | Stephanie Lerma | Sara Mast | Jeri Eisenberg | Hilda Shen | Nancy Richards Davis | Zoe Ani | Sandi Miot | Dawna Bemis | Susan Delgalvis | Charyl Weissbach | Alicia Forrestal-Bohm | Renee Magnanti | Peggy Epner | Catherine Nash | Lorrie Fredette | Susan Tonkin Reigel | Sue Katz | Nathan Hatch | Shelley Gilchrist | Stephanie Armbruster | Susanne Arnold | Bianca Pratorius | Toby Sisson | Russell Thurston | Gregory Wright | Ruth Hiller

and now…The 29 Portfolio Artists:

Anne-Marie Brown | Debra Ramsay | Howard Hersh | Lisa Pressman | Binnie Birstein | Cecile Chong | Marybeth Rothman | Kim Bernard | Ellen Koment | Lynda Ray | Nancy Natale | Paula Roland | Kathleen Lemoine | Sara Mast | Jeri Eisenberg | Hilda Shen | Renee Magnanti | Peggy Epner | Catherine Nash | Sue Katz | Nathan Hatch | Shelley Gilchrist | Stephanie Armbruster | Susanne Arnold | Bianca Pratorius | Toby Sisson | Russell Thurston | Gregory Wright | Ruth Hiller

Nicely done, one and all!

And now, some words from Joanne Mattera…

A Word About the Selections

The insistent message of the 415 entrants to this competition is that there is a lot of really good work being made in encaustic—accomplished work that has a presence and a point of view. The work I selected for this volume reflects but a fraction of the painting, sculpture and work on paper worthy of inclusion. A different judge would surely have selected a different exhibition. Indeed, 10 judges could easily have selected 10 compelling and totally different exhibitions from the images submitted.

Some artists removed themselves from the running with images that did not represent the work well. Most egregiously were those several images not adequate for publication, either in quality or in size. This is an exhibition in a book, after all, so if the images were not of sufficient reproduction quality, they could not be considered. Relatedly, some artists submitted work that simply was not photogenic—work that would read as blurry or that was so subtle the image would be lost in print (there are five or six degrees of separation from your actual work to its representation in ink on paper). In a bricks-and-mortar exhibition, the juror might accept such work provisionally, reserving final judgment when the work could be seen in person; that’s not an option when the exhibition is in print. (I saw this same situation when I was considering images for The Art of Encaustic Painting 12 years ago.) Image quality counts.

Other artists presented images that did not hold together as a portfolio. Indeed some submissions looked like a group show; that’s the mark of a beginner, someone who has not yet found a visual identity or the courage to say, “Thisis what I do.” And yet others are still in the experimentation stage; they’ve learned what they can do with wax, but it’s all about technique—medium without message.

Overall, though, the biggest issue is that 415 entrants (!) submitted work for which a fraction could be selected. Congratulations to those of you who made it in. I know the rest of you will not stop here. There are other competitions, other opportunities to show. You will find a place for what you do.